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15 posts tagged Pakistan

7th April, 2014

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.
It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.
Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.

It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.

Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

(via The Atlantic)

30th October, 2013

23rd September, 2012

mehreenkasana:


Today, tens of hundreds of people showed up from 8 year olds to 60+ senior citizens in different cities of Pakistan to clean up the mess created by the few individuals who somehow always end up defining Pakistan. Here’s to all of today’s participants, you’re the reason why we have a good future. Pakistan is proud of you.
[x]

What saddens me the most is that, like they said, mainstream media will never cover this amazing act of unity and peace by Pakistanis after the riots. Thousands and thousands of Pakistani citizens came out after the violent riots and cleaned up streets, public venues and other places to prove that the disruptive ones don’t speak for the goodhearted majority.
More power to you, Pakistanio.

This is reality.

mehreenkasana:

Today, tens of hundreds of people showed up from 8 year olds to 60+ senior citizens in different cities of Pakistan to clean up the mess created by the few individuals who somehow always end up defining Pakistan. Here’s to all of today’s participants, you’re the reason why we have a good future. Pakistan is proud of you.

[x]

What saddens me the most is that, like they said, mainstream media will never cover this amazing act of unity and peace by Pakistanis after the riots. Thousands and thousands of Pakistani citizens came out after the violent riots and cleaned up streets, public venues and other places to prove that the disruptive ones don’t speak for the goodhearted majority.

More power to you, Pakistanio.

This is reality.

(via مہرین کسانہ)

8th July, 2012

“Had the graves been found under Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi’s compound in Libya or in the rubble of Homs in Syria, there surely would have been an uproar. But when over 2,000 skeletons appear in the conflict-ridden backyard of the world’s largest democracy, no one bats an eye. While the West proselytizes democracy and respect for human rights, sometimes going so far as to cheerlead cavalier military interventions to remove repressive regimes, how can it reconcile its humanitarianism with such brazen disregard for the right to life in Kashmir? Have we come to accept that there are different benchmarks for justice in democracies and autocracies? Are mass graves unearthed in democratic India somehow less offensive?”

Mirza Waheed, “India’s Blood-Stained Democracy,” NY Times op-ed

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/08/opinion/sunday/indias-blood-stained-democracy.html

It’s hard to accept, but probably closer to the truth than we’d like.

(via "She sang beyond the genius of the sea")

6th December, 2011

You wouldn’t have thought anti-Americanism in Pakistan could get any worse, but last week NATO attacked a Pakistani army post, killing 24 Pakistani soldiers. Even before this episode, for which NATO expressed deep regret, it would be difficult to find a country on the planet that was more anti-American than Pakistan. In a Pew survey this year, only 12% of Pakistanis expressed a favorable view of the United States. Populist rage and official duplicity have built up even though Washington has lavished Islamabad with aid totaling $20 billion over the last decade.

I think it’s time to recognize that the America’s Pakistan policy is just not working. I write this as someone who has consistently supported engaging with the Pakistani government as the best of bad options. But the evidence that this engagement is working is thin - and gets thinner with every passing month.

Supporting Islamabad has been premised on two arguments. The first is that if we don’t, the Pakistani government could collapse and the country’s nuclear weapons could fall into the wrong hands, perhaps even ending up with al Qaeda. This misunderstands the problem. Pakistan is not Somalia. It has been ruled by a professional military for most of its independent existence, even when there has been a nominally civilian government in charge - as there is today. There have been no Gaddafiesque colonels’ coups in Pakistan; instead, the entire military, with its command chain intact, has moved to replace the civilian government. The military remains widely admired as a national institution that works.

The second argument is the one given by businesses when they pay off the Mafia: ‘We need to keep these guys as allies, or else they will become enemies.’ The problem with this protection racket is that it isn’t working. Admiral Mike Mullen finally said publicly what insiders have said privately for years: Pakistan’s army, despite getting over a quarter of its budget from Washington, funds and arms the most deadly terrorist group in South Asia.

Pakistan’s military needs to stop playing games to keep Afghanistan weak and India off balance. It needs to start trying to create peace, stability and prosperity for its people. In other words, Pakistan needs a civilian conception of its national interest. And it can only get that from a flourishing civilian government.

Fareed Zakaria, “Pakistan - friends without benefits” (CNN Global Public Square blog)

http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2011/12/04/zakaria-pakistan-friends-without-benefits-2/

(via thebardofavon)

(via "She sang beyond the genius of the sea")

2nd April, 2011

While I still have cricket fever,

I’d like to say that I have a great deal of admiration and respect for the way the captains handled the entire tournament. Of course, we love Dhoni after the win, but even before hand, he was a leader, an example to be followed, and I am sure he will be for years. But, not only him, also Sangakkara for Sri Lanka and Afridi for Pakistan had kind, honest words when it was both their turns to express themselves. I feel we can learn lots on how to comport oneself on an international stage from this trio. 

30th March, 2011

Great great great game! Really glad I watched at least some of it! Congratulations to India for the win and Pakistan for putting up a fight! Let’s try and bring that Cup home, baby!

24th March, 2011

And they pull off a great one! Congrats to India and one week until an epic showdown against Pakistan! Bring it!

The cherry on top- sent the three time World Cup champs packing, bye bye Australia!